theme
crime
reblogged 59 minutes ago & 604 notes
I write and that way rid myself of me and then at last I can rest.
Clarice Lispector (via writingquotes)    
reblogged 2 hours ago & 6,425 notes
reblogged 3 hours ago & 16 notes

cantankerousquince:

I once was assisting with properties for a ballet company which meant a lot of hanging about in the wings and defending the props from grabby hands. One night I was really bored so decided to see what would happen if I said “Macbeth”, you know, for science. 

Part of the set fell down.

The curse is real people.

reblogged 20 hours ago & 432 notes

tinfoilrobot:

Okay so if Vastra is a Silurian and more reptile-like than mammal-like, consider:

  • Vastra grabbing bugs of the sill with her tongue when no-one’s looking
  • Vastra sunning naked as the day she was hatched in her conservatory
  • Vastra seeking out small, dark places when worried
  • Vastra becoming embarrassingly cuddly when the chill of Victorian London gets to her
reblogged 1 day ago & 45,551 notes
jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

reblogged 1 day ago & 424,944 notes

highbrowandbeard:

THIS IS MY NEW FAVOURITE LINE

reblogged 1 day ago & 36,879 notes
frogmakesart:

That was supposed to be just a quick and simple mermaid drawing, but then I did a background. What’s gotten into me?!

frogmakesart:

That was supposed to be just a quick and simple mermaid drawing, but then I did a background. What’s gotten into me?!

reblogged 2 days ago & 13,657 notes
reblogged 2 days ago & 131,771 notes
theneolistickid:

Bats illuminated by lightning

theneolistickid:

Bats illuminated by lightning

reblogged 2 days ago & 59,488 notes
gruenkariert:

This has to be back on my Tumblr.

gruenkariert:

This has to be back on my Tumblr.

reblogged 2 days ago & 228,350 notes

unamusedsloth:

Nude Portraits series by photographer Trevor Christensen

reblogged 3 days ago & 107,402 notes

essayofthoughts:

indigoumbrella:

essayofthoughts:

indigoumbrella:

huffpostarts:

In The Not So Distant Future, Glow-In-The-Dark Trees Could Replace Street Lights

Is that… is that even healthy?

There are sea organisms and fungi which glow in the dark and there’s fireflies and jellyfish which glow in the dark. It doesn’t do them any harm nor does it do the people around them any harm. I would say its pretty healthy, as well as it would mean more photosynthesis happening in cities which mean cleaner air.

I was just curious about how they were doing it and for some reason I didn’t think to click the link. But thanks! It makes more sense now. I was afraid it was some kind of chemical thing.

nah just genetic modification using existing bioluminescent genes. Genetics is really cool, and so is bioluminescence. I mean they’ve already made pigs glow using jellyfish genes and pigs are waaay more complicated than trees iirc. So they’re actually (i think) less likely to muck it up with trees.

In which case

GLOWY

FORESTS

GLOWY

TREES

GLOWY

EVERYTHING

(I like glowy things)

reblogged 3 days ago & 11,848 notes

soyonscruels:

I’ve made a lot of mistakes in my life but at least I didn’t just give Steven Moffat an Emmy

reblogged 3 days ago & 82,102 notes

allthebeautifulthings9828:

I smell it in the air. It’s coming.

image

Halloween season.

reblogged 3 days ago & 802 notes